This Summer's Weather Promoted Lawn Disease

Conditions This Bad Not Seen In A Decade!

What a summer!  Drought-like conditions in July followed by rain, rain and more rain in August. Unfortunately, those are perfect conditions for infectious lawn diseases. Honestly, we haven't seen this type of disease-favorable weather in 10 years! Think of it as the "perfect storm" for lawn disease. Diseases like brown patch, dollar spot, Pythium blight, leaf spot diseases and the appearance of symptoms of summer patch and necrotic ring spot. While temperature and moisture can bring on these diseases, there are other factors that take over once the disease becomes established.

Also, some grasses are more affected than others by lawn disease...but all lawns are affected...

Kentucky Bluegrass

* Less prone to brown patch, dollar spot, gray leaf spot and Pythium blight
* Very susceptible to root diseases such as necrotic ring spot and summer patch
* Can tolerate some infection
* During periods like is past summer, infection-impaired plants cannot survive and dead patches or rings appear

Turf Type Tall Fescue

* Susceptible to gray leaf spot and brown patch
* Not susceptible to root diseases

Perennial Ryegrass

* Very susceptible to many lawn diseases
* Truly a bad year for perennial ryegrass
* Not susceptible to root diseases

Watering & Lawn Disease

Keep in mind that if you water at the wrong time of day, you could be making a bad situation even worse. The worst time to water is between 6:00 and 9:00 p.m. Watering at that time only encourages lawn disease. It could mean the difference between a mild symptoms and a severe outbreak. To help prevent lawn disease think deep infrequent daytime watering...not light frequent watering.

Our Recommendation

The best thing you can do for your lawn now is not to apply fungicides every two weeks, but rather to build up a healthy population of microbes in your soil that will fight the bad guys.  Over time, our applications help to do just that.

 

Most Recent

Your Lawns Could be Harming Your Cats

September 30, 2016 by Leigh Marcos

This guest post is from Leigh Marcos, a lover of all animals, especially cats. You can read more about how to care for your pets at the Shield My Pets website. This article is personal to me. As a cat lover, I have seen first hand what going all out to have the perfect lawn can do to your cat. In my case this was the piratic Mr. Spot. The great wanderer and mischief maker supreme. This is a summary of what Ive learned the hard way about how our lawns can affect our cats if we are not careful. How Pesticides Affect Cats In short, the fertilizers and pesticides we use on our lawns are poisonous to cats. As cats spend a large chunk of their time outdoors, this puts them at a higher risk of interacting with these toxic substances. Cats often nibble at grass and plants for medicinal reasons, but even if they do not, they step in the fertilizer and brush against plants sprayed with pesticides then they lick their fur and their paws while cleaning themselves. If ingested in large enough

This Summer's Weather Promoted Lawn Disease

September 27, 2016 by Alec McClennan

Conditions This Bad Not Seen In A Decade! What a summer! Drought-like conditions in July followed by rain, rain and more rain in August. Unfortunately, those are perfect conditions for infectious lawn diseases. Honestly, we havent seen this type of disease-favorable weather in 10 years! Think of it as the perfect storm for lawn disease. Diseases like brown patch, dollar spot, Pythium blight, leaf spot diseases and the appearance of symptoms of summer patch and necrotic ring spot. While temperature and moisture can bring on these diseases, there are other factors that take over once the disease becomes established. Also, some grasses are more affected than others by lawn disease...but all lawns are affected... Kentucky Bluegrass * Less prone to brown patch, dollar spot, gray leaf spot and Pythium blight * Very susceptible to root diseases such as necrotic ring spot and summer patch * Can tolerate some infection * During periods like is past summer, infection-impaired plants cannot

The Return Of The 17-Year Locusts!

April 20, 2016 by Alec McClennan

Theyre baaaack! This year, cicada bugs (a.k.a. 17-year locusts) will emerge in Northeast Ohio. Cicadas live almost all of their 17 year life underground before emerging. When they emerge, cicada nymphs climb trees, shed their skin and fly. The one goal of the flying adult cicada is to mate and produce more cicadas. The good news is that these adult cicadas will live only four to six weeks (males die shortly after mating). But its going to be a noisy four to six weeks. From sunrise to sunset we will be hearing the high pitched and shrill mating song of the males. Where a lot of these insects are present their singing can be quite annoying. Because so many of them (think millions) will descend on us all at once, they can harm your young trees and shrubs. When the female lays her eggs, she looks for the small branches of deciduous trees (not pine trees). This applies to trees like Apple, Cherry, Dogwood, Japanese Maple, Hickory, Oak, Maple, Ash, Holly, Willow, etc. They will even plant

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